How is a Shiatsu Session Conducted?

Shiatsu can be described as the Japanese art of healing, through finger pressure on the body.

This is recommended for problems like headaches, fatigue, anxiety, excess stress, depression, and so on.

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On average, a Shiatsu session lasts about an hour or so. You will be asked to wear loose-fitting and light clothes for maximum comfort.

For the first few minutes, the practitioner will ask you questions about your overall physical and emotional well-being. This discussion could include your sleeping patterns, medical history, exercise routine, lifestyle choices, relationships, work, eating habits and so on.

After the discussion, you will be asked to lie down on a plinth or a futon. Your therapist will then cover your body with a thin, light cotton sheet.

Next, the practitioner will use their hands and fingers to massage your body through the cloth as well as your clothing.

Deep pressure, rubbing and stretching movements will be used to help your muscles relax.

During the session, the various pressure points on your body will be pushed, while certain muscles are warmed or eased. You will be asked to breathe deeply when any of the pressure points are being pushed, to facilitate the proper movement of energy.

In the last few minutes of the session, your therapist will give you some time to rest and enjoy the relaxation benefits. As you get up you will be asked to drink a glass of water, for detoxification.

Do remember that Shiatsu is not a quick-fix for minor ailments. You may need to undergo a few sessions, before you notice any benefits.

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