Suryabhedana Pranayama For Good Health

Submitted by Kevin Pederson on March 9, 2012

It is claimed that if one practices Suryabhedana the practitioner is not troubled by the effects of cold. In extreme cold so much heat is generated in the body, through Suryabhedana, that warm clothing becomes quite unnecessary. According to ancient Yoga texts, there are two currents flowing in our body.

One is called Chandra-Nadi and is associated with the left nostril.

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When it dominates in breathing a cold effect is produced. The other current called Surya-Nadi is linked to the right nostril. Its preponderance in breathing raises heat in the body.


By adjusting the currents in Yoga breathing (pranayama) you are supposed to be able to produce the desired effect.

Breath is our life force - it sustains life. No one can live for more than a few minutes without air. When our breath ceases, our life comes to an end. The ancestors of Yoga came up with a special technique called pranayama to raise, cultivate and control this Prana (life force). In normal breathing we use just a fraction of our potential breathing capacity. Pranayama helps us control our Prana (life force) in a better and unusual way to derive the maximum benefits.

Suryabhedana has in fact a lot to do with body temperature. Considering that the above claim is true then it has been observed that Suryabhedana pranayama causes the body temperature to rise. In fact, an appreciable change in the body temperature has been observed in experiments with this variety of pranayama. The concepts of Chandra and Surya have more than just this significance. It is proved that 20 rounds of Suryabhedana pranayama is an ideal remedy for common colds, rhinitis, and sinusitis.

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